Monthly Archives: January 2018

Science

We’re beginning the registration process for this year’s Summer Science and Arts Program (June 11 – July 19) at Learning Circle Preschool. The summer program features an integrated science and arts curriculum. What does summer science look like?

There’s a way in which everything young children do is science. Using one’s senses to explore the environment, investigating how things work, expressing curiosity, asking questions, observing, and then integrating all that new information to make more, or new, sense of the world, are all central to how children learn and experience their world. Teachers can follow children’s lead, stimulate new thinking, encourage deeper considerations, offer new information and tools, suggest steps or approaches to try, and join in as children explore together.

Science might look like:

• Open-ended and child initiated explorations of materials and space in the environment, either individually or in small groups
• Discussions and investigations of materials, photos, or books brought to a group by teachers or children
• Use of tools to observe the environment, and then to document those observations to share with others or to compare with other related observations from day to day• Questions posed to individual children or a small group with a problem to solve or a topic to consider:

– Can we make waves in the water table? What is making those waves bigger?
– What do you notice happening when we mix these ingredients in the “potion”?
– Let’s look at how this plant is changing day by day…
– What living things are we sharing space with when we use our playground? – How can we see the wind?
– How can we move this ball faster (or more slowly) up or down the ramp system? – What do we know about….

• Collecting data and noting changes using documentation or charts and graphs over time
• Making predictions and guesses about what will happen when actions are taken

Teachers find the best topics by setting up a stimulating environment indoors and outdoors, and then engaging with children in that space, watching and listening carefully to collect information on what seem the most meaningful to children. Then we make sure the right tools and opportunities are available for children to pose questions, make predictions, observe, document, reflect, and share.

Science is everywhere!

Enjoy these photos featuring science experiences at LCP:

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Support for Learning

In a busy classroom there are many distractions that pull teachers away from their capacity to see the small details in what a child might be doing that would give clues about the important purposes or questions that are likely under consideration. If we want to see, value, and extend children’s ideas we teachers need to be fully present in the child’s moment, develop our capacities to observe, and assure that children know through our body language and interactions that we have fully joined them. Children know when we are truly listening and when we are distracted, and need our full attention in respectful interactions with teachers to learn deeply. This is true as we set a safe emotional social climate for children, and it is equally true when we try to understand what children know or are curious about in specific content areas.

A recent example of this came when a young 3-year old approached a game set up to put pom-poms in cups labeled 1-12 using tongs. We teachers imagined the task as a straightforward one, primarily supporting counting and number sense as children organized the cups in number order, read or asked about number symbols, and arranged pom-poms. We introduced our ideas about the basic task and joined children as they manipulated the tools and materials available to them.

This 3-year old clearly wanted me to stay and play and I was lucky enough to feel able to join her without needing to check in often on other classroom activities. She understood the basic task as we presented it, found the 1 and the 2 cup, and chose her pom-poms, clearly more interested in the tongs, the texture and the color of the pom-poms than in counting. She proceeded to take handfuls of pom-poms, filling and emptying cups, talking with me about their colors, and making piles. I left a few times as she played, promising to come back as soon as I could, and whenever I was there we chatted about her piles, colors, and her process. I occasionally asked an open-ended question like “I wonder where those need to go” but I mostly watched and described what I saw her doing.

As she worked, she started to try to take 3 pom-poms at a time in her tongs (after all her 3 -year old birthday wasn’t that long ago and 3 is an important number!) She took the 6 cup, in which she had already placed 3 pom-poms, and added 3 more and said, “Look at this, now I have 2 sets of 3 pom-poms!”

Looking at her first approach to this material, I might have easily made assumptions about her level of understanding of numbers, and underestimated her skills and understanding.  I might have tried to teach by pointing out how many pom-poms belonged in each cup. I might have missed her interest in the number 3 as she manipulated the tongs. And I might have undervalued her strong interested in sorting by color.

I might easily have missed her accurate use of the word “sets” as she added 3 pom-poms to 3 already in her cup labeled 6. If I did, I would have had less insight into conversations and experiences she is probably having with family, as I am fairly certain we haven’t introduced the word or concept of sets here at school.

Another example also came when a child was using math cards – building and/or extending patterns with bears in 3 sizes and colors. She called me over, proud to share that she had successfully matched the bears. She hadn’t tried to extend that pattern, so I simply asked “but what would come next?” That started an extended game with me, where she would choose a bear that matched one but not both attributes that would accurately complete the card as designed. We were both laughing and repeating “but what would come next?” Rather than correct or teach, I left it there and we moved on with our day’s activities. It was 2 days later that she called me over again, proudly sharing the same card, this time with the pattern extended.

Children learn in relationships, and deserve our full, uninterrupted attention whenever we can give it.

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